The Rectus Femoris Muscle Attachments

The Rectus Femoris Muscle

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb 2 Comments

The rectus femoris muscle is one of the four muscles that makes up the quadricep group of muscles. This is the only one that crosses the hip joint and therefore is related to tight hip flexors. Personally, I have come to find that it is critical in allowing the pelvis to move during backbends.

The Gastrocnemius Muscles

Flexed or Extended Foot in Lotus Posture

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Postures 19 Comments

I’ve been hearing for years that we should flex our foot in various yoga postures where we have our knees bent at ninety degrees or more. More recently I’ve received two seperate emails regarding the application of this technique to lotus posture. Should the foot be flexed or extended in padmasana? It’s time I throw in my own two-cents on this topic. As many of you know, I’m for whatever works. If it helps when you flex your foot, then the answer is flex your foot. But why does this work? Is it necessary?

To Squeeze or Not to Squeeze? Upward Facing Dog

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Postures 24 Comments

This month’s newsletter article comes out of a recent trip to the Midwest. I was at a new studio with new students and hosts. This piece is actually a request from one of the hosts, Evan at Tapas Yoga Shala. The question arose; Should we squeeze or not squeeze our butt in upward facing dog? As always on the first day of practice, I mostly watch and get a sense for what I want to work on with any of the students over the course of the 5 days of mysore classes.

Padmasana Article

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Postures 3 Comments

The basic goal of all the asana practice is finding and maintaining a comfortable padmasana (lotus pose) for meditation. There are a few key anatomical components and principles to finding this comfort. The foundation of the pose is the crossing of the legs and “sit bones” comfortably on the floor. With a firm foundation we find an upward energy and lift in the spine, which eventually becomes effortless.

The Knee Part 2 by David Keil © 2005 Enlightened Practice Magazine

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Injuries 3 Comments

In Part 1 of this article we left off looking at the deepest, most intrinsic structures that make the knee function as it does. In this part of the article we’ll continue to look at another deep structure, the meniscus and also talk about some of the soft-tissues (muscles and ligaments) that affect this joint and how it all fits into our yoga practice.

The Knee Part 1 by David Keil © 2005 Enlightened Practice Magazine

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Injuries 2 Comments

In our last article, we looked at the part of our anatomy that grounds us, literally, the feet. Making our way up the body, the next major joint we come to is the ever elusive and sometimes tricky knee. This knobby pair of joints are often an enthusiastic topic of conversation amongst yogis as it seems everyone knows somebody who’s either injured a meniscus or torn an ACL, or done “something” to it.

Foot Foundation by David Keil © 2005

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb Leave a Comment

Those wonderful glorious feet, unfortunately, kept in containers (shoes) most of the day. Poor things have quite a responsibility in both our everyday walking/living life and particularly in our yoga practice. The foot foundation is useful in both. As a therapist, the feet are one of the first things I look at as it’s important to see what someone is standing on all day.