Padmasana Article

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Postures 3 Comments

The basic goal of all the asana practice is finding and maintaining a comfortable padmasana (lotus pose) for meditation. There are a few key anatomical components and principles to finding this comfort. The foundation of the pose is the crossing of the legs and “sit bones” comfortably on the floor. With a firm foundation we find an upward energy and lift in the spine, which eventually becomes effortless.

The Knee Part 2 by David Keil © 2005 Enlightened Practice Magazine

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Injuries 3 Comments

In Part 1 of this article we left off looking at the deepest, most intrinsic structures that make the knee function as it does. In this part of the article we’ll continue to look at another deep structure, the meniscus and also talk about some of the soft-tissues (muscles and ligaments) that affect this joint and how it all fits into our yoga practice.

The Knee Part 1 by David Keil © 2005 Enlightened Practice Magazine

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Injuries 2 Comments

In our last article, we looked at the part of our anatomy that grounds us, literally, the feet. Making our way up the body, the next major joint we come to is the ever elusive and sometimes tricky knee. This knobby pair of joints are often an enthusiastic topic of conversation amongst yogis as it seems everyone knows somebody who’s either injured a meniscus or torn an ACL, or done “something” to it.

Foot Foundation by David Keil © 2005

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb Leave a Comment

Those wonderful glorious feet, unfortunately, kept in containers (shoes) most of the day. Poor things have quite a responsibility in both our everyday walking/living life and particularly in our yoga practice. The foot foundation is useful in both. As a therapist, the feet are one of the first things I look at as it’s important to see what someone is standing on all day.

Got Sit Bone Pain? – What To Do With That Hamstring © 2010

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Injuries 43 Comments

I was in the DC area this month and saw a student that I knew from a previous workshop. At that time Patricia had recently “pulled a hamstring”. Her major symptom was sit bone pain (sit bone = ischial tuberosity) when folding forward, secondary was that it would also hurt when sitting for long periods, especially in the car. I saw her just a couple of weeks ago and she still had the same pain.