Tensor Fascia Latae Muscle

Tensor Fascia Latae Muscle and the Iliotibial Band

Christine Wiese Anatomy, Lower Limb 1 Comment

This month I’m highlighting a unique muscle, the tensor fascia latae along with its related structure, the iliotibial band. This is one of the muscles responsible for abduction at the hip. It can also affect movement at the knee through its connection to the iliotibial band. Take a look at where this muscle attaches, what actions it does, and how it is used in yoga practice.

back pain yoga injuries anatomy

Injuries in Yoga – Framing the Conversation

David Keil Yoga Injuries 41 Comments

My biggest issue with the current discussions regarding injuries in yoga is the desire to make things measurable and compartmentalized. I know, there is no way around this. We have to talk about the parts and pieces to some degree so that we can understand it all. The place where this happens regularly is in the mixing of yoga and asana as if they are the same thing.

Response to NYT Article – How Yoga Can Wreck Your Body – Yoga Injuries

David Keil Yoga, Yoga Injuries 55 Comments

It is disheartening to see the New York Times come out with yet another article that seems to completely miss the point of yoga. I think this one is worse than the last, which described a woman going to yoga and eventually realizing that cross training would lead to smaller sized clothing than if she only did yoga. I can only imagine how these NYT articles are put together and why. Picking quotes and statistics that fit the agenda of the author perhaps? What is the point exactly of this article, to warn people to not try or practice yoga? Is it to break up certain myths surrounding yoga? What does this really say about yoga injuries?

Padmasana Article

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Postures 3 Comments

The basic goal of all the asana practice is finding and maintaining a comfortable padmasana (lotus pose) for meditation. There are a few key anatomical components and principles to finding this comfort. The foundation of the pose is the crossing of the legs and “sit bones” comfortably on the floor. With a firm foundation we find an upward energy and lift in the spine, which eventually becomes effortless.

The Knee Part 2 by David Keil © 2005 Enlightened Practice Magazine

David Keil Anatomy, Lower Limb, Yoga Injuries 3 Comments

In Part 1 of this article we left off looking at the deepest, most intrinsic structures that make the knee function as it does. In this part of the article we’ll continue to look at another deep structure, the meniscus and also talk about some of the soft-tissues (muscles and ligaments) that affect this joint and how it all fits into our yoga practice.